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Photos from the Panama Canal
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COLLECTION 2
Panama Canal Panama Canal Panama Canal Panama Canal Panama Canal Panama Canal
Panama Canal Panama Canal Panama Canal Panama Canal Panama Canal Panama Canal
Panama Canal Panama Canal Panama Canal Panama Canal Panama Canal Panama Canal
Panama Canal Panama Canal Panama Canal Panama Canal Panama Canal Panama Canal

 
Photos by Joseph H. Krause

The building of the Panama Canal involved three main problems engineering, sanitation, and organization. Its successful completion was due principally to the engineering and administrative skills of such men as John F. Stevens and Col. George W. Goethals, and to the solution of extensive health problems by Col. William C. Gorgas.

The engineering problems involved digging through the Continental Divide; constructing the largest earth dam ever built up to that time; designing and building the most massive canal locks ever envisioned; constructing the largest gates ever swung; and solving environmental problems of enormous proportions.

Despite lethal landslides, workers with dynamite and clumsy steam shovels cut their way across a continent. They built a railroad, three sets of concrete locks, and a huge artificial lake. Nine years later the freighter Ancon entered the new channel. Hundreds of construction workers hopped aboard for the historic ride. A shiny towing locomotive pulled the Ancon into the first lock. Bands played and crowds cheered as the ship slipped into the Pacific.
 

Panama Canal Panama Canal Panama Canal Panama Canal Panama Canal Panama Canal
Panama Canal Panama Canal Panama Canal Panama Canal Panama Canal Panama Canal
Panama Canal Panama Canal Panama Canal Panama Canal Panama Canal Panama Canal
Panama Canal Panama Canal Panama Canal Panama Canal Panama Canal Panama Canal

 
It took 10 years, the labor of 75,000 men and women, and almost 400 million dollars to complete the job.

The Panama Canal started moving traffic in August of 1914.

More than 75 years after the first official ocean-to-ocean transit of the waterway, the United States and Panama have embarked on a partnership for the management, operation and defense of the Panama Canal. Under two new treaties signed in a ceremony at OAS headquarters in Washington, D.C., on September 7, 1977, the Canal will be operated until the turn of the century under arrangements designed to strengthen the bonds of friendship and cooperation between the two countries. The treaties were approved by Panama in a plebiscite on October 23, 1977, and the U.S. Senate gave its advice and consent to their ratification in March and April 1978. The new treaties went into effect October 1, 1979.
 

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